Training A German Shepherd Made Easy

Training a german shepherd is made easy with the basic puppy training package of Dove Creswell, puppy training and dog training online.

German Shepherd Dog Training

1. German Shepherd Dog Training The Gentle Way.

German Shepherd dog training is best accomplished by starting early. German Shepherd training must recognize the high energy and herding instinct of these dogs. Negative behavior must be dealt with in a consistent and kind manner, not by slapping, hitting and kicking. Positive behavior must consistently be rewarded both with praise and treats.

Your dog’s behavior may be modified at any time during it’s life. German Shepherd dog training is much easier if started with your puppy. It’s unfair both to the animal and the owner to let problems go unaddressed. Behavior problems lead to frustration for both dog and owner.

2. House Training Your German Shepherd.

If your dog will be inside, house training your German Shepherd puppy is very important. It isn’t just that soiling the house is such a mess, which it is! If your puppy is not house trained fairly quickly, the dog ends up at another home or at least outside. That’s why proper house training is so important.

One method of training your puppy is the crate method. Confine your puppy in a crate or a small area. Puppies usually won’t soil their sleeping area. Frequently remove the puppy to an area for waste elimination. If the puppy does have an accident, you can quickly rush them to the appropriate area. But, remember, accidents will happen, so be patient and consistent. These animals are very smart and will catch on quickly.

3. Biting, Mouthing, And Chewing.

All German Shepherd puppies will bite and chew on body parts and clothes. That’s just what puppies do. But early on, this painful and destructive behavior must be stopped. It must be stopped in the puppy phase.
If the puppy has a chance to play with other puppies, the playing will naturally teach restraint in biting. With little interaction with other dogs, you must deal with the behavior yourself. One approach is to say "ouch" , which should be easy to do, in response to puppy bites. You can use a pained expression in your voice, but not loud or angry. Then try leaving the room for a short time.

4. Barking And Whining.

Is there a real reason for the barking or whining? Is he or she uncomfortable? Can you determine why? There may be a good reason. Or is this blackmail? Your puppy must be taught to handle isolation and separation. They must not expect to get everything they want.

Spend plenty of time with your puppy so they feel loved and secure. But do not accept excessive noise that is irritating to the human members of the household.

5. German Shepherd Dog Training – Socialization.

A properly socialized puppy is well adjusted and will be a pleasant, valuable companion. Socialization most easily occurs before the puppy is 3 months old. Make sure early experiences are not frightening nor painful. Try some of the following.

Invite friends to meet your puppy.

Invite other pets where possible.

Carry your puppy to places where there are crowds of people.

Take your puppy for short car rides.

Acquaint your puppy with being bathed, brushed and inspected.

Introduce your puppy to anything and everything you wish them to be around.

There are many German Shepherd dog training "secrets" that professional dog trainers don’t want you to know.

Find all of them here: German Shepherd Dog Training!

Al Bullington writes about rural living and home business topics from his homestead in the country, surrounded by a variety of critters.

By Al Bullington
Published: 6/9/2007


Related Blogs

Posted under Puppy Training Classes

This post was written by Noel DCosta on March 25, 2009

Tags: ,

The Secrets Of Training A German Shepherd

Learn all the secrets of training a german shepherd from Dove Creswell and her basic puppy training package.

German Shepherd Training Secrets

German Shepherds are extremely active dogs. Needing lots of attention and exercise, they are very smart, bold, and determined.

German Shepherd Training Secrets
Enlarge Image

The German Shepherd is an extremely active dog, as anyone who is fortunate enough to share their home with them can attest to this. Needing lots of attention and exercise, they are very smart, bold, and determined. To ensure that your dog is a happy, well-adjusted member of your household, German Shepherds must have training as they are naturally dominant dogs. Controlling your German Shepherd is a must or he will control you.

So, want to know the best way to train your German Shepherd? Before we share some important points with you, let’s get the biggest secret to training your German Shepherd out of the way. It is…

CONSISTENCY

Consistency! You’ve heard it before but it’s true. We’ve seen it before; someone gets a German Shepherd puppy and underestimates the amount of time and attention it will take to train it effectively. Dog training is pretty simple, give her praise when your puppy does something you want, and correct your puppy when she does something you don’t want. Doing this consistently will eventually train you German Shepherd effectively. In essence, training you dog enhances to special bond you have with your dog. Dogs are more comfortable when their owners establish themselves as the leader of the pack. This is a naturally occurring rank and you can promote it by following these teaching points. We will go over the best ways to train your German Shepherd so you will ensure a happy and long relationship.

First understand that your dog’s actions are largely governed by instinct so it is up to you to balance your dog’s instinct with conditioned behavior through human training. You can do this by correctly establishing in your household a social hierarchy from the very first day you bring your German Shepherd puppy home. This naturally occurring hierarchy is headed by the Alpha dog, which is the dominant dog, followed by the Beta dog, or second in line for dominance, and bringing up the rear is the Omega dog, which is dominant to none. The Alpha dog is submissive to none, dominant to all, and the supreme ruler in the pack. The Beta dog is submissive only to the Alpha but dominant to all other dogs. The Omega dog is submissive to all other dogs.

The most essential point to remember is that your German Shepherd needs an Alpha dog to give him firm, consistent leadership and is happiest when this occurs. However, your German Shepherd is instinctively wired to better his pack position so beware of periods when he tests boundaries, especially during training. He may push your buttons by misbehaving or ignoring commands that he has already learned. This is normal and the best way to work through this is with consistency and maintenance of the training program you have established.

The Alpha wolf in the wild will always decide where to hunt and when he will decide where to settle the pack. After each kill, the Alpha wolf always will eat first as the unequivocal leader of his pack. There are no exceptions. He governs his pack in a firm and fair way, with no exceptions to his law.

What does all this have to do with training your dog? Simply that you must be the Alpha dog in your pack to effectively train your German Shepherd. He will work harder to please you if he understands his relationship with you. This will also establish a proper relationship between you and your dog right from the start and he will bond more closely and deeply to you.

There is a special situation that you must consider. It is this: Imagine being a petite woman married to a big guy who is 6’4" and weighs 225 pounds. In your dog’s mind, you probably won’t be recognized as the Alpha dog; although your husband might recognize you as such. This is because the undetectable scent he puts off to the dog and his deeper voice establishes him as the Alpha dog. Even though you might have to work a little harder, you can easily establish yourself as the Beta dog, dominant over all other dogs in your household. Are the kids the Omega dogs, then? Definitely not! It is essential that they participate in the training of your German Shepherd so they will also be dominant over your dog.

By David Perrin
Published: 1/17/2007


Related Blogs

Posted under Puppy Training Classes

This post was written by Noel DCosta on March 10, 2009

Tags: ,

Potty Training Your German Shepherd

Potty training your german shepherd has been made very easy with the basic puppy training package of Dove Creswell.

Here Is Some Helpful Hints On German Shepherd Potty Training

You can be successful at German Shepherd potty training if you remember that your dog wants to learn. You can use the crate method for German Shepherd potty training just be sure to do it right and keep meal times consistent. You are going to need to spend a lot of time with your dog to successfully complete German Shepherd potty training.

Now that you have brought your German Shepherd puppy home you need to start thinking about German Shepherd potty training. German Shepherds take to training very well so if you follow the training procedures and make sure you have a lot of patience then you should not have a lot of problems getting your German Shepherd puppy housebroken. Just remember that your puppy is going to require a lot of your attention during this period, so be there for your puppy and do housebreaking the right way.

Part of doing housebreaking the right way is knowing that German Shepherd puppy wants to do the right thing and wants to make you happy. So if there is an accident somewhere in your house, don’t assume this is the puppy acting out. It is only an accident and you cannot punish a puppy for an accident. Punishment only confuses the puppy and may cause behavioral problems later in life so do not punish your puppy.

When it comes to German Shepherd potty training many people use the crate method and, if done correctly, this method is both humane and effective. You can crate your dog at night to sleep or when you are not home but be sure to not leave it in the crate too long and also to let it out as soon as you get home or wake up. A crate will force the dog to hold it until it can be let outside and teaches it to keep its area clean. Always have the dog out of the crate when you are home and watch the dog for signs that it will need to go outside.

You can help your own housebreaking cause by feeding the dog on a regular schedule so that you know when you can expect the dog to need to relieve itself and you can take it to its spot outside. Also keep an eye on the dog after it drinks water and make sure you get it outside as soon as possible so it can do its thing.

You are going to need to spend a lot of time with your dog while you are German Shepherd potty training. You should take your dog out to its designated spot constantly, potentially every forty-five minutes or so, and let it know that the designated spot outside is where it is supposed to do its thing. If you praise the dog profusely when it uses its designated spot outside then you will find better results with the potty training effort.

If you do things as you are supposed to, and show the dog unconditional love and patience, you should be able to accomplish German Shepherd potty training without much problem. There may be accidents but just clean them up and move on. Remember that anything you do when they are pups could come out later in life as bad behavior so always do your best with your German Shepherd potty training.

Jan Ryan participates in charitable events for local and national animal rescue groups. This article contains helpful advice on German Shepherd training. This article makes a great supplement to dog training books.

By Jan Ryan
Published: 5/7/2008


Related Blogs

Posted under Potty Training Puppies

This post was written by Noel DCosta on March 10, 2009

Tags: ,

Training German Shepherd Pups

Training German Shepherd Pups would be very enjoyable if you use the basic puppy training package by Dove Creswell.

German Shepherd Pup: Know the Details

Whether you are bringing a German Shepherd pup home as a pet who is just a pet or a pet who should also act as a guard dog, it is important to take the right steps to make sure no one gets hurt. The German Shepherd pup should view their owner as their leader. If the leadership is not present, the pup will take the role because they are pack animals by nature.

When raising a German Shepherd pup, you want to be careful that the techniques you use will be beneficial to your puppy not only for their safety, but for the safety of you and your loved ones. German Shepherd Puppies are protective by nature so they are generally a fantastic addition to a family’s home. But, you want to make sure that they are protective over their family when strangers come around, instead of being protective of them around you. In order to achieve this, the bonding and training process must be a strong one while the pup is still young.

Making one right or wrong decision in the training process can mean a lifetime of a dog that doesn’t want to listen and who cannot be trusted. If your German Shepherd is going to be a guard dog for you make sure that they are going to be a dog that is more of an alarm, rather than a violent dog as a violent dog always has the chance to turn on its owner if angered or confused. Dogs are pack animals and the German Shepard pup is no exception to this rule. Within every pack there is a pack leader and it is vitally important to establish who the pack leader is from the beginning. A human adult should always be the pack leader and never the dog. When raising your pup, it is important to know that proper German Shepherd puppy care should be taken into consideration in order to achieve the results that will make for a wonderful pet and possible guard dog.

Never be violent with your dog when trying to raise them to view you as the leader. The leader must be someone the dog respects so that you have a smaller chance of the dog turning on you in the future. Your German Shepherd pup should be trained with care and if the need arises, seek a professional trainer’s advice before its too late. As soon as you see a problem that you do not know how to deal with, it is better to seek help then to wait until it gets out of hand.

An important thing to remember when raising a German Shepherd pup is that how the dog turns out as an adult is never its own fault, but the results of the training or the lack there of. Make sure that you provide your puppy with the proper nutrition so that he or she can grow into a healthy dog instead of a dog who is always ill which can make behavior problems arise as they have no other way of showing you their discomfort. Make sure that potty training, and basic commands are taught right away. All German Shepherd Puppies should know the basic commands such as sit, stay, heel and come. These commands are extremely important in order to maintain control of every situation and even to protect the dog’s life. Giving your German Shepherd pup the care, love and training that it needs while it is still young is vital so that you have a well-behaved dog in the future.

Jan Ryan’s extensive knowledge about dog training makes for a valuable source in regards to the German Shepherd pup and their care. The German Shepherd pup is not only a wonderful friend to have in the house but a great alarm, as they are ready to bark at any sign of danger. German Shepherd Puppies must be taught though who is in control though. When thinking of bringing a German Shepherd pup into your home, it is important to understand everything that is involved. German Shepherd puppy care should never be taken lightly.

By Jan Ryan
Published: 3/10/2008

 


Related Blogs

Posted under Puppy Training Classes

This post was written by Noel DCosta on March 7, 2009

Tags: ,

Classic German Shepherds Need Classic Training

 Train the classic German Shepherd with basic puppy training commands.

The German Shepherd Origin and History – A Dog in a Class by Itself

A brief introduction into the origin and history of our beloved German Shepard…

The German Shepherd Origin and History - A Dog in a Class by Itself
Enlarge Image

The German Shepherd dog breed has its origin in the late 1800s when Max von Stephanitz from Germany began developing a breed that would later become the dog we know today as the German Shepherd.Von Stephanitz desired to produce a dog breed that could be utilized as an all-around working dog.

Developed from various farm and herding dogs of his time, von Stephanitz’s original German Shepherd was derived from a herding dog he acquired in 1899, and he and his friend Artur Meyer formed the Verein fur Deutsche Schaferhunde which was the first club in the German Shepherd dog breed history. This club and von Stephanitz kept tight control over the breed until his death in 1936.

He determined which dogs would be used to breed based on how well they did in various shows and trials that were the precursor to the Schutzhund tests still performed today. His main criteria for judging a dog’s success were both its usefulness coupled with its intelligence. Von Stephanitz also promoted the utility of the breed to the German government for work in both the police and the military as well as other all-purpose uses as a working dog breed.

German Shepherd Breed History

Following the creation of the German Shepherd breed by von Stephanitz in the early 1900s, the breed’s popularity soon soared and became one of Germany’s most popular dogs. Serving in both World War I and II, the German Shepherd was a favorite military dog, primarily in Germany, but American and British soldiers were also impressed by the breed and brought the dog home following both wars.

In fact, one of the most popular German Shepherds dogs was Rin Tin Tin, originally from France, and brought to America by an American GI following the first world war. Rin Tin Tin went on to make 26 movies until his death in 1932 and contributed to the breed’s enormous popularity.

In addition to its use in the police and military arenas, German Shepherds have a history of usefulness in other areas, is known as a successful show dog and has been a popular family pet. German Shepherds were the first dogs used as seeing eye dogs in the late 1920s and Helen Keller, an avid dog lover, owned a couple of German Shepherds.

The first German Shepherd Club in America was formed in 1913 and the breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1908. Instantly recognizable, the German Shepherd continues to be a popular dog breed, and the German Shepherd is continually in the top five most popular registered breeds as determined by the AKC.

German Shepard History and Origin information found at Large Dog Breeds.com. German Shepard profiles and history related know-how are added weekly within our expanding library of large dog breed material.

By John Hinkle
Published: 12/6/2006


Related Blogs

Posted under Puppy Training Classes

This post was written by Noel DCosta on March 7, 2009

Tags:

Know How To Train Your German Shepherd.

The most important thing you should know about your german shepherd is the basic puppy training skills to train him or her in to a good german shepherd dog.

German Shepherd – The facts every owner of this dog breed should know

Learn the facts on maintaining good health, grooming needs, living conditions and more when it comes to the German Shepherd. 

Also known as the Alsatian, the German Shepherd is a ‘young’ breed, having only been recognized as a distinct breed in the last 90 years. The German Shepard can trace its roots back to a range of shepherding dogs in Germany, and some groups tried to informally breed this dog. This effort failed but in 1899, a new group formed. Der Verein fur Deutsche Schaeferhunde was founded by Max von Stephanitz, who wanted to breed an all purpose working dog.

The German Shepherd came to the United Sates in 1908 with soldiers impressed by the courage and abilities of this dog. German Shepherds will reach an average height of 22 to 26 inches, weight of 77 to 85 pounds and live an average of 13 years. There are a wide variety of coats in this breed. Some German Shepherds are longhaired and some are shorthaired. The color is most often black and tan, but can also be sable, all black, blue and liver and white.

The one thing all German Shepard coats have in common is that they shed profusely, and shed worse during their shedding season. Daily brushing usually helps combat the shedding, and German Shepherds should only be bathed occasionally. Almost all German Shepherds are described as self-confident and loyal.

German Shepherds are highly intelligent and often times used as police dogs, rescue dogs and guide dogs. German Shepherds make excellent guard dogs and are very loyal to their family. They make excellent protectors, barking when someone unfamiliar is approaching. German Shepherds do make good family pets and will guard the children of ‘their’ family. They will tolerate the poking and prodding children are prone to do. However, they are sometimes unaware of their size and power relative to a small child and may indiscriminately knock them over.

A German Shepherd and child should always be watched to avoid this. German Shepherds can survive apartment living if given enough exercise regularly and given enough activities. If left alone too long or not stimulated enough, German Shepherds will become bored and destructive. They enjoy being in the company of their human family but not other pets. As a working dog that likes to please, a German Shepherd will do very well with obedience training. German Shepherds are prone to some genetic disorders including hip and elbow dysplasia, blood disorders, digestive problems, epilepsy, chronic eczema, keratitis (inflammation of the cornea), dwarfism and flea allergies.

There is a website that has great information on German Shepherds and most other breeds of dogs. It has details that pertain to a dog breeds health, grooming, living conditions, best food choices and more, the website is called: Dog And Cat Facts, and can be found here

Robert W. Benjamin has been in the software business on the internet for over 5 years, and has been producing low-cost software for the past 25+ years. He first released products on the AMIGA and C64 computer systems in the late 1970′s-80′s. Seasonal Vacation Spots

   By Robert Benjamin
Published: 8/21/2007


Related Blogs

Posted under Puppy Training Classes

This post was written by Noel DCosta on March 5, 2009

Tags: ,

Names For German Shepherd Puppies

A name is a name. Training the german shepherd to recognize its name and respond to it, is more important than the name itself. Dove Creswell and her online basic puppy training package will get your german shepherd dog to recognize his or her name.

German Shepherd Dog Names: Popular Dog Names For A Popular Pup

When shopping for the best German Shepherd Dog Names, finding the right one can be a bit of a chore. Do I pick a German dog name? or a more general name? Or maybe I should choose a name that fit’s this breeds looks, or personality. Here’s some help when making your decision…

Finding good German Shepherd dog names is no easy task. When one considers that this breed has consistently ranked as one of the most popular dog breeds in the world, it’s no wonder that you as a lucky owner will want to find a name that fits like glove.

A couple of things you may have struggled with when coming up with a name, is whether to give your Shepherd a general dog name, meaning a good dog name that might be shared by other dogs, or a German dog name, meaning one that reflects this breeds country of origin.

Well have no fear, for this article will share with you puppy name suggestions that will cover both of these categories. Keeping in mind that the German Shepherd is such an intelligent, hard working breed, when coming up with these names we intentionally stayed clear of foo-foo dog names. You certainly won’t find any names like Sparky, or Puddles on this list!

In our first category we’ve picked a few general names that we felt might fit this breed. We hope you’ll agree.

General German Shepherd Names:

Apollo: Like the ancient Roman god, this dog has a presence of it’s own.

Duke: A stately name for the dog who rules your palace.

Majestic: A good name for a dog that is just that…

Rambo: For the Shepherd who thrives on adventure.

Tiara: A feminine, yet strong sounding female name.

Other general names…
Avalanche, Freedom, Genghis, Harley, K-9, Max, Ninja, Rio, Saber, Sarge, Summer, Thunder, Tia

In this next category, we’ve listed German dog names and their meanings. Hopefully, by providing the meanings, it will make choosing the right name easier, and the name more special to you and your dog.

German Dog Names:

Boy Names and their meanings…

Arnold – Eagle, Powerful

Axel – Father of peace

Barrett – Strong as a bear

Bruno – Brown haired

Conrad – Brave counsel

Hank – Ruler of the estate

Jaegar – Hunter

Kaiser – Leader

Karl -A free man

Lance – Knight’s attendant

Otto – Rich, wealthy

Reinhard – Brave, or a fox

other boy names…
Audi, Autobahn, Atlas, Attila, Beethoven, Blitz, Boris, Brando, Caspar, Conan, Einstein, Fabian, Franz, Freud, Fritz, Gunther, Gustav, Hannibal, Hanns, Herman, Igor, Klaus, Luger, Max, Mozart, Navarone, Reinold, Rembrandt, Romel, Rudy, Schnaps, Siegfried, Wolfgang

Girl Names and their meanings…

Adele – Noble, kind

Alison – Of noble birth

Anna – Gracious

Berta – Intelligent; Glorious

Brigitte – Strong spirited

Brooke – A stream

Elke – Noble and kind

Elsa – Noble

Emily – Industrious

Emma – All embracing

Gretchen – Little pearl

Heidi – Noble and kind

Katrina – Pure

Steffi – A garland or crown

other girl names…
Adelle, Avita, Babette, Bavaria, Blanca, Brandy, Brita, Danika, Elke, Elsa, Enya, Fraeulein, Hannah, Kalif, Kasandra, Kazimir, Misha, Noeska, Rachel, Sabine

I’m sure you’ll agree that your Shepherd deserves the best, not only in it’s care, but also the care you show when choosing the best name possible. Considering that you’ll be using that same name over 30,000 times over your dogs lifetime, you can see how important choosing the right German Shepherd dog name can be.

When Richard Livitski isn’t busy digging up German Shepherd Names, he’s working on his dog names website http://www.dog-names-and-more.com where dog names and puppy names in all shapes and sizes can be found.

By Richard Livitski
Published: 3/27/2007

Posted under Miscellaneous Content

This post was written by Noel DCosta on March 5, 2009

Tags:

German Shepherd Training Secrets

There may be secrets in the basic puppy training approach to training German Shepherds, but Dove Creswell covers it all in her online puppy and dog training package.

Secrets of German Shepherd Training


Training a German Shepherd can be as simple as it can get challenging. The training is no different from what is imparted to other canines. The German Shepherd learns quickly and is generally very alert…

Secrets of German Shepherd Training

German Shepherd training secrets involve teaching the canine to display a certain code of conduct around environment, circumstance and established responsibility. The animal is known to make a good watch dog and adapts easily to indoor or outdoor dog kennel arrangements. The German Shepherd responds easily to command. This particular breed reciprocates well to certain methods and combinations of methods to learn obedience. German Shepherds take to herding, tracking, retrieving, hunting and guarding easily. They are agile and alert by inherited nature.

Secrets of German Shepherd Training:

German Shepherds are taught basic ‘dog obedience training’ through commands, tricks, leading and rescuing techniques and hunting. The canine is known to respond to instinctive behavior at appropriate times. Though the specific behavior pattern of the German Shepherd may differ from that of other canines, the underlying principles are not very different. The trainer has to take on the ‘alpha’ role prior and while training the animal. German Shepherds are best trained young, since their natural instincts favor cooperation early. The instincts and the training get refined through the formative years of selective behavior. The German Shepherd is popular as a domestic dog not only because of its correct interpretation of training techniques, but also due to the breed’s natural ability to respond to signals promptly.

The secrets of German Shepherd training include:

Develop a common language: The German Shepherd is naturally endowed for advanced training and service for intended purpose. It is very important to ensure that the pet dog understands commands. Like other canines, German Shepherds too do not figure out the ‘obedience’ on their own. They have to be trained and like other modes of animal communication, training a German Shepherd too calls for the development of signs and commands that the dog can understand. The underlying principle of the communication should be simple – reward good behavior and ignore or correct the undesired.

Get the basics right: The trainer should endeavor to get the basic pet obedience training commands right before getting over-ambitious. The common commands of ‘sit’, ‘down’, ‘stay’, ‘come’ and ‘loose-leash’ should be practiced first, and thoroughly. The animal should be able to execute the basic commands ‘by ear’. The first two weeks of a German Shepherd puppy’s life, or the neonate period is excellent for training. The pups learn from simple associations. They show amazing capacity to sense and learn. The pups soon enter the socialization period, when play, investigation, mock fighting and body contact helps to developing strong social relationships.

Reward desired behavior: German Shepherds love to be rewarded. The pups respond well to rewards in the form of praise and petting, pet food treats like bones and biscuits and play. In fact, failure to reward the canine only makes training more difficult. Rewards also help the animal to differentiate between safe and dangerous situations and behavior.

Correct undesired behavior: Correction should never involve physical force or violence. This kind of behavior by the ‘alpha’ only results in a loss of enthusiasm, stress and show of aggression. The German Shepherd responds well to a light jerk on the collar. The best alternative to physical correction is to deprive the canine of a preferred location or an activity.

Co-ordinate hand-sound commands: German Shepherd puppies begin learning commands and tricks early. It is preferable to consider the pup’s stamina and then build on concentration and desired physical coordination. The hand-sound co-ordination should be simple and such that the animal is able to relate to one without the other at times. The command ‘sit’ with a wave of the hand should be thorough and in the absence of the dog trainer, the canine should be able to sit on verbal command.

The secret of dog training lies in timely application of reinforcing techniques. It is very important for the canine and trainer to be very comfortable with one another. German Shepherds should be socialized regularly. Training the animal will take time. It should be a natural process that is interspersed with vaccinations, socialization and domestic and outdoor fiasco.

By Gaynor Borade
Published: 2/3/2009


Related Blogs

Posted under Puppy Training Classes

This post was written by Noel DCosta on March 4, 2009

Tags: ,

How To Train German Shepherds

Training German Shepherds may need some extra basic puppy training skills, which is adequately covered in Dove Creswell’s dog training package.

German Shepherds: Training a German Shepherd Dog


German Shepherds are friendly dogs. Here are a few tips to train a German Shepherd dog.

German Shepherds: Training a German Shepherd Dog

German Shepherd Dog is also known as GSD, Alsatian or Schferhund. Germany is its country of origin. The breed German Shepherd is fairly a new one and dates back to the late nineteenth century. Originally, these dogs were trained as shepherd dogs for herding sheep. Later, these dogs were recruited as police dogs because of their intelligence and obedience. It is one of the most favored pet dogs around the world, due to its protective nature and loyal behavior to its master.

A German army officer Max von Stephanitz, first bred this dog. In 1899, he established a German Shepherd Dog Club and coined various strategies to market the breed German Shepherd. Here we look at the various tips for training a German Shepherd.

Tips for Training a German Shepherd

A German Shepherd pup is a bundle of energy and very playful. It belongs to the category of large breed of dogs such as Great Dane, Labrador, Mastiff and so on. As a pup, a German Shepherd needs a lot of love, affection and care. It would be wise and easy to impart training to a pup than an adult dog. The training should be imparted, when the dog is around six weeks of age.

While imparting training, you may use food to reward the dog if it performs well. For instance, if you are training the dog to bring your morning newspaper, roll the paper and ask the dog to hold it between its teeth. Ask him to bring it to you. If he does it well, appreciate him using phrases such as “good”, “well done” and so on. This training can be continued, till he does it perfectly. At the end of the training, reward the dog with his favorite food.

The first and foremost thing to teach your German Shepherd is the “sit down” command. There are many ways to train a German Shepherd to sit. One of the ways is to hold a few dog biscuits in your hand and bend slightly towards the dog. Place your hand (the one with biscuits) over the head of the dog. When the dog tries to see where the biscuit is, it is most likely to sit down. Now you should clearly the say the word ” Sit” and repeat this exercise ten to fifteen times. Train the dog to get up only when you issue the command “come”. Do not allow the dog to snatch the biscuits from your hand. You need to keep in mind that a young German Shepherd pup gets tired easily and has a short span of attention. So keep the training short, say for 5 to 6 minutes.

While training your German Shepherd, keep the surroundings calm and quiet. Avoid a surroundings that could cause distraction to the training program. The dog must be given ample time to understand and grasp the new commands without being disturbed. You can reprimand the dog, if he misbehaves. However, never use a stick to implement training. This could have negative effects on the dog. As the dog grows, you could increase the length of the training period. As the owner of a German Shepherd, if you feel you cannot impart training yourself, enroll it in a good dog training class.

By Maya Pillai
Published: 11/20/2008


Related Blogs

Posted under Puppy Training Classes

This post was written by Noel DCosta on March 4, 2009

Tags: ,

Do’s And Don’ts On Puppy House Training

Dove Creswell deals with all the do’s and don’ts in her online training package

Puppy House Training Do’s And Don’ts

House training a puppy is important for the well being of your puppy and for your own sanity. The lack of house training is the number one reason that dogs wind up neglected, abandoned, or in animal shelters, but it’s the failure of the owner – not the puppy.

It’s very important for you to house break your puppy properly. Proper toilet habits need to be established when your puppy is young, since these habits can last a lifetime, and are very hard to break once they’re established. In most cases, true house training can’t begin until your puppy is six months old because puppies younger than that probably lack the bowel and bladder control needed for true house training.

Before they reach that age, puppies should be confined to a small, puppy proofed room during those times when you can’t supervise them. Puppy proofing a room is very similar to baby proofing a room. Just as you would put breakables and possible choking hazards out of reach of a baby, you need to eliminate the potential for your puppy to make a mistake and reduce any potential hazards from the room. That includes removing anything that your puppy might chew on.

The entire floor of the room should be covered with newspaper or some other absorbent material, and the paper should be changed every time it is soiled. Over time, you will notice that your puppy has a preferred spot for using the toilet. Gradually begin reducing the amount of paper you put down – narrowing in on that preferred area.

This preferred toilet area will form the basis of later house training and once your puppy is old enough you’ll begin to train him to exercise bladder and bowel control. You will establish a new toilet area (outside) and begin to train him to control himself until taken outside to the toilet area.

The Do’s of House Training Your Puppy

* When you’re not at home or can’t supervise your puppy, you must be sure the puppy can’t make a mistake. Confine your puppy to a small area that has been thoroughly puppy proofed. Make sure your puppy has unrestricted access to the established toilet area

* When you’re home, physically take the puppy to the toilet area every 45 minutes. Extend the time between potty trips gradually, as your puppy exhibits an ability to control his urges.

* Always provide a toilet area that doesn’t resemble normal floor coverings in your home. Training your puppy to go on concrete, blacktop, grass or dirt is a good idea.

* Reward your puppy every time he eliminates in the established toilet area. You want him to associate relieving himself in the established areas with good things, like treats, toys and praise. A little play time makes a good reward, and will reinforce the early bonding between you and your puppy.

* Keep a set schedule when feeding your puppy, so that your puppy’s need to relieve himself becomes consistent. Provide constant access to fresh, clean drinking water.

* Keeping your puppy in a crate can help your puppy develop self control. Dogs don’t like to soil their immediate living area, and will naturally try to control their need to go.

* It’s important to be patient when house training your puppy. The process of house training could take several months, but it’s much easier to house train right the first time than to retrain a problem dog.

The Don’ts of House Training Your Puppy

* Don’t give your puppy the run of the house until he has been thoroughly house trained.

* but… Don’t totally isolate your puppy while house training, either. Your puppy needs attention and interaction from you.

* Never reprimand or punish your puppy for mistakes. That only leads to fear and confusion in your puppy and will make the process take longer.

* Don’t leave food out all night as your puppy won’t keep to a set feeding schedule on its own, and will eat throughout the night. Random feeding leads to random toilet habits.

House training isn’t always the easiest thing to do, and some dogs are much harder to house train than others. It’s important to be patient, consistent and loving as you train your dog. A rushed, frightened or intimidated dog will be confused and won’t be able to learn the his house training lessons. Once you’ve gained your puppy’s love and respect, you’ll find that house training your puppy is actually easier than you expected.

By: Brandon Layne

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

Brandon Layne is affiliated with ezPuppyTraining, which offers a free basic puppy training course covering house training and basic puppy obedience.

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Related Blogs

Posted under House Training Puppies

This post was written by Noel DCosta on March 3, 2009

Tags: , ,

Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional