Training an older dog

Finding good homes for rescued and abandoned dogs can be a problem because many people are hesitant to adopt an older dog.

They are apprehensive about the dog having behaviour problems that they may not like and feel it may be difficult to cure.

Contrary to the cliché, you cannot teach an old dog new tricks, training an older dog is not any more difficult than training a few weeks old pup. The most common problems people have when adopting older dogs, are:

  • Aggression,
  • Barking too much, and/or
  • Soiling inside the house.

There is no need to fret or be too worried even if your new older dog has all of the above problems as there are techniques that can be used to train your new pet and make him or her behave properly, learn its place within the family and become a valuable and loved addition to your household.

Unlike a new pup, an older dog has been someone’s pet before and has had been exposed to humans and may have formed certain unacceptable behaviour patterns, may know and respond to certain commands, etcetera, etcetera.

The first thing to do is to try and find out as much as you can about these things, because you cannot correct something you are not aware off.

Try and find out if the dog has any aggression problems, such as aggression towards other dogs, towards people, or aggression over his food. If it has an aggression problem you will need to pay immediate attention to correcting such problems, because this could lead to someone getting bitten.

Check out his disposition, see if he or she responds to basic obedience commands, like ‘Sit’, ‘Down’, ‘Come’ and the like.

The main thing to watch out for is to see whether the dog displays any fear while responding, as it may have been abused while being trained by its pervious owner.

Make sure about the level of house training the dog has ever had and you will know where to
begin in training your older dog. Armed with the knowledge as described above, the next move would be to use any professional step by step program that takes you from basic obedience training exercises right through more advanced training.


Secrets To Dog Training
by Daniel Stevens would be an ideal program in this situation.

By doing this you are taking all the guess work out of training your older dog, ensuring at the same time, that you will not be making the same mistakes everyone always makes when trying to train a dog without a good system in place.

Every professional dog trainer emphasizes the use of positive training techniques. Use positive reinforcement, to give praise and rewards for correct behavior, and make the dog know how you want it to behave.

By using a professional program you will also learn how to communicate in a way that your dog understands. The correct use of voice supported by body language goes a long way in training your older dog effectively.

Become the Alpha Dog, and leader to your dog. Gain his respect, confidence and trust as the Alpha dog and he or she will be eager to follow your lead. The dog’s basic nature is to please the superior member of his or her “pack”-which happens to be you and your family.

Get your whole household involved as they should help you in being consistent with the rules you have set down for the dog to obey and follow, avoiding anything that would cause conflict and confusion in the dog’s mind.

Use the right training methods, and your older dog will quickly learn its place in his new “pack”.

Establish yourself as the Alpha leader, you will have good results in correcting and solving behavior problems your dog may have brought with it.

Training an older dog can turn out that you have the best addition to your family and a pet that you can be comfortable with in any social situation.


Related Blogs

Posted under Dog Puppy Training

This post was written by Noel DCosta on August 31, 2009

Tags: ,

Basic Dog Training. – House Training. – Introducing the crate.

Basic dog training begins with the successful house breaking of the dog.

How would anyone describe a successfully housebroken dog? There is one simple description.

An housebroken dog will never use the house as his or her toilet. There is still a lot of misconception and misunderstanding about a dog and its toilet habits.

Many people still firmly believe that by sending the dog out into the backyard at regular intervals during the day, they are house training the dog. What they do not realize is by merely taking it outside, or letting it outside, does not mean that the dog knows why it has been taken out or let out.

The root of that problem is communication. A dog by nature, would love top please you, its owner, but it cannot, because it does not know how to communicate with you.

The theory behind house training a puppy is all about devising a means of preventing it from doing its dirty business inside the house, by giving it the opportunity of doing it outside.

This can only be successful if at the same time the dog is taught how to communicate with you and goes outside when it is told to go and or tells you that he has to go outside.

Dogs are creatures of habit and they learn from association. Our training if consistent would help it quickly learn to associate the outdoors with the act of relieving itself.

We must learn to take advantage of the wonderful natural instinct of the dog’s desire to keep its sleeping area clean, and not to mess in it.

This is where the crate enters the picture. Make the crate the dog’s den and its bed. If the crate is the correct size, the dog will never soil it, if it cannot get out. It will restrain itself till let out.

We must also capitalize on the fact that dogs are pack animals by nature, and den animals by instinct. Leave a dog free in a house and you would notice that it would pick its own den, under a desk, behind a couch or in a closet.

A dog crate is the ideal and perfect, natural den for the dog. Make it its bed. It also serves as a safe, place to keep the pet whenever necessary, for its safety your peace of mind.

When first introduced to the crate and locked in, puppies may raise hell, but they would quiet down and accept it eventually without any problem.

If you are one of those humans who think that confining a puppy to a cage is cruelty, please think again. By confining a puppy to a crate we are actually catering to its basic instincts.

Cast your mind to the wild, and ask yourself where would a dog sleep at night, out in the open? Where anything and everything can attack it or harm it? No, it finds a secluded spot, a cave, behind the trunk of a fallen tree where it has a feeling of security and protection.

The proper use of a crate merely satisfies the dog’s basic desire and urge to feel safe, protected and secure.

As mentioned earlier some puppies would scream their living heads off, and carry on at that for quite a few number of days, but that is something you would have to put up with if you want to house train him. You have to get him or her used to the crate, else spend a lot of time scooping up dog crap from your carpet.

Remember that the puppy will get to realize that its screaming is getting it nowhere and soon stop, as long as you ignore it. Whatever you do, please DO NOT LET THEM OUT OF THE CRATE WHEN THEY ARE SCREAMING.

If the screaming bothers you that much place the crate with the puppy in it in the garage or the basement, or leave the house for a few hours, the puppy will get tired and stop yelling.

Like little children small pups will naturally sleep 15 to 18 hours a day. This is normal. They quickly learn that the crate means taking a nap.

You have just completed the first step to house breaking your puppy, You have made it accept the crate. More on crate training later.

Posted under House Training Puppies

This post was written by Noel DCosta on August 28, 2009

Tags: , , , ,

Canine Arthritis: When Your Dog’s Joints Ache

Basic Puppy Training should also involve the good health of your dog. This article on canine arthritis should help dog owners who have older dogs that have joint problems.

Like people, dogs can suffer from arthritis. Protective cartilage usually covers bones that are near their joints. When they walk, run, or move in any way, the cartilage on the ends of the bones rub against each other. There is no discomfort because there are no nerves present in the material. However, over time, that protective covering slowly deteriorates. When that happens, the underlying bones are exposed to one another; when your pooch moves, they rub together and cause pain.

Often referred to as degenerative joint disease (DJD), arthritis is a debilitating condition in canines. In this article, we’ll take a look at some of the factors that contribute to – or exacerbate – the problem. We’ll also explain how owners can manage the issue.

Contributing Factors And Symptoms

As canines age, the cartilage that prevents their bones from rubbing against each other naturally wears away. This is known as primary DJD and affects nearly all breeds. Many breeds are also susceptible to hip and elbow dysplasia, genetic disorders that impact ball and socket joints. Both disorders can lead to osteoarthritis, which is commonly called secondary DJD. Other factors that can lead to canine arthritis include obesity, problems related to the metabolism, and inflammation caused by fractures.

The first sign of DJD is usually an uneven gait; dogs will shift the majority of their weight onto whichever legs are not arthritic. They will also have difficulty getting up if they have been lying down for a prolonged period. Depending on the current stage, a dog could lose ihs appetitie and become more reclusive.

How To Manage The Problem

Degenerative joint disease is progressive, so discomfort tends to increase over time. That said, owners can help their dogs cope with the pain through a number of treatment strategies. Dysplasia of the hips can often be treated with a hip replacement, though a veterinarian may avoid recommending it depending on the health of your dog. Vitamins, supplements, and medications that help reduce the inflammation may also be prescribed.

Owners can also pursue a more holistic form of treatment. For example, weight management is critical for canines suffering from DJD since extra weight can place undue stress on their joints. In fact, veterinarians will often recommend waiting to perform surgery or prescribe medications if a dog is severely overweight.

Daily low-impact exercise will help control weight gain. Activities such as swimming or walking will give your pooch the opportunity to use his limbs and maintain his muscles without exacerbating his arthritis. Also, climbing and descending stairs, and jumping into and out of vehicles can worsen his DJD; a ramp can significantly reduce the impact on his joints.

Ask your veterinarian for treatment options of your dog does devleop arthritis. Whether through surgery, medications, exercise, or a combination of all three, you can help improve your canine’s quality of life.

Find the best Dog Treats and Dog Chews at http://www.bestbullysticks.com

Posted under Puppy Care and Puppy Health

This post was written by Noel DCosta on August 23, 2009

Tags: ,

The Gentle Basset Hound – Cherished By Families Everywhere

With basic puppy training knowledge it would be very simple to train this family favorite.

The Wonderful Basset Hound is a dog that weighs on average 60 pounds and around 13" in height and fits in to the category of a medium to large dog. The Basset Hound is long and low and their height/weight ratio makes their already short legs look even shorter. In fact, their name comes from the French word "bas" which means low.

They are without doubt one of the most loving, patient and gentle dogs you could hope for which is one of the reasons they fit so well into family life. Coupled with their keen sense of smell and hunting instints you will also find them great hunting companions.

Recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1885, the usual colors for the Basset Hound are a variety of hound colors, but they are typically white with chestnut or sand colored markings. The fairly dense coat is short, straight, hard and lovely and smooth to the touch. Their coat is easy to groom and only requires an occasional brushing and shampooing.

This loving, gentle dog is ideal for family life. They are excellent and patient with small children, even if normal day to day life does not include children. They are affectionate with their family and love to be around them. They are great with other dogs and pets as well, although it is usually a good idea to introduce them to other pets in the home because they might chase them due to their hunting instincts.

Basset Hounds love nothing more than lazing around the house just relaxing, which makes them an ideal dog if you live in an apartment. Having said that they do enjoy playing and require regular, exercise and time to run. If you don’t have a garden, you should plan to at least take them on a daily walk. They are fairly easy to train, but if they are on the trail of a scent, they will not pay any attention to you. For this reason, a fenced in yard is best. They have a tendency to gain weight, so monitoring their food intake and giving them ample exercise is important.

The Basset Hound originated in France and dates back hundreds of years. Their ancestry can be traced back to the Bloodhound. Back in the day they were primarily hunting dogs using their extraordinary sense of smell to track their prey. Even though they can still be used for hunting, they are seen more as companion dogs today.

Few breeds equal the Basset Hound’s gentle, forgiving, laid back nature. They are perfect for active families and for those that just enjoy an occasional walk provided their Basset Hound can have daily outside time.

Whether you have small children or other pets or dogs, the Basset Hound can fit into just about any type of family dynamic with little to no adjustment problems.

Posted under Miscellaneous Content

This post was written by Noel DCosta on August 23, 2009

Tags:

Controlling Dog on Dog Aggression

There are a variety of reasons dogs may act aggressive. Aggression is a natural part of their personality. Dogs evolved with a need to be aggressive. They used aggression to protect their dens and families and to hunt and kill their prey.

The aggression instinct is something that remains even after thousand of years of domestication by human, and at times controlling that aggression is necessary for the dog owner.

In order to control your dog’s aggression it is a good thing to know how to recognize your dog’s body language for warning signs. Learn to understand the reasons dogs become aggressive towards other dogs, throught tips on basic puppy training  so that you can control aggression before it becomes a problem.

There are a variety of ways dogs try to show they are dominant, such as placing their own head over the other dogs, or by putting their paws on top of the other dog’s shoulder area. As they become more aggressive they will raise the hackles on their back, growl and show off their teeth. Stopping dog to dog aggression should be done before this is allowed to happen. If the second dog does not begin to act submissively at this point, there will very likely be a dog fight. Of course you have seen this type of dog behavior many times. If you pay attention to your pet, you’ll see these disturbing behaviors in time to be stopping the dog on dog aggression that could otherwise soon follow.

If you try the tip below, I think your dog’s attitude will change for the better, once he knows the fun of having a doggy friend.

  • Bring your aggressive dog with you to the house of a friend who has a dog that is non-aggressive. If you have a male dog, I’d strongly suggest starting this "friend" training with a female dog. It is also a good idea either at your friend’s place or in a neutral territory like a park, so your dog doesn’t feel like he is protecting his turf.
  • By keeping both of the dogs on leashes, you retain control in case the dogs react aggressively. Place the dogs into the sit position while they are apart enough that they cannot reach. Keep your dog in the sit position and do not let him become agitated or aggressive. Give your dog praise and a reward once he has stopped his aggression and calmed down- be sure to let him know you are happy with his calm behavior. It is important for you to be consistent to get the best and quickest results with your dog training. Be sure not to yell at your dog, a that just emphasizes a negative attitude.
  • Dogs greet each other first by sniffing each other’s faces, so as long as they are calm it is time to let them say "Hi". When relaxed dogs greet each other neither one is displaying teeth, growling or raising hackles. If your dog remains relaxed now, you have started the process of removing his aggressive attitude toward other dogs.
  • For future meetings, try using different locations to check the aggressive dog’s attitude. The repeated meetings with another friendly dog will serve to desensitize your dog’s aggressive attitude towards other dogs.
  • Try to have a final test visit in your dog’s own yard, once he is comfortable with his new friends company. Start the final test with the dogs on the leash, just in case the aggressive dog cops an attitude on his home turf. If your dog does remain calm, then it is OK to unleash them and let them play together. Your dog is on his way to losing that bad dog on dog aggression-what a relief.

Now you know a good way to stop your dog’s aggression problems, and the beginning of him being able to make friends with other dogs.

Try introducing your dog to a new friend and I bet you will have good results stopping your dog’s aggressive attitude.For more information on dog obedience training and solving dog behavior problems, please click here- www.BehaveDoggy.com

For the very best dog training program on line please click here to visit Secrets to Dog Training.

Posted under Dog Puppy Training

This post was written by Noel DCosta on August 21, 2009

Tags: ,

Things That You Should Know About Premature Puppy Care

There are so many different things that you should know about when it comes to premature puppy care, and so whether you are a veterinarian or not, you should still know at least something about premature basic puppy training, so that if the situation ever arises where you need it, then you will be prepared and ready.

About Premature Puppy Care

One of the first and most important things that you need to know about premature puppy care is the fact that they are a lot like humans; premature puppies need warmth, and loving, and you also need to make sure that they do not get dehydrated.

Especially with the constant heat that you have to have surrounding them, they can often get incredibly dry, and so you have to make sure that they are taking in enough fluid to keep themselves healthy.

As for the heat, you are going to want to make sure that you have them in a mildly heated room, with lots of blankets covering them. This is because, in order to provide the proper premature dog training, you want to make sure that the room itself is not overly humid, but that there are enough blankets to keep every part of them warm.

If you found more than one puppy, then the best idea is to let them sleep all together and then cover them with the blankets, because not only will this keep them even warmer, but as well it will help them to get better quicker because they will have the company of another dog there beside them.

As for food and nutrition, premature puppies will not, for the most part, eat a lot of food. What they need to be drinking at that point anyway is milk, and so if their mother is not around then you are going to have to provide the milk for them.

You will most likely have to feed them out of bottles until they are old enough to feed on their own, and this means making sure that you put them on a feeding schedule so that they can get enough milk, and so that you will not forget when or how much to feed them.

Love is one of the most important factors of all here, and so as long as you love the puppies and treat them well, they are most likely going to make some sort of positive progress.

Posted under Miscellaneous Content

This post was written by Noel DCosta on August 21, 2009

Tags: ,

Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional