Teach Your Puppy Bite Inhibition

Any dog without the concept of bite inhibition, which is taught to a dog with dog training biting,  is positively annoying and dangerous to have as a pet. With such a pet, a child’s: harmless play session can and will definitely turn into a very painful experience.

Dogs, while they are pups, are not capable of inflicting any serious damage. Their teeth may be razor sharp but their jaws are too weak to do much more than draw a trickle of blood. With an adult dog it is just the opposite.

An adult dog can do a great deal more than just scratch the surface, and it does not make any difference to tell the wounded human that the dog "did not mean to bite".

This is how you teach your dog bite inhibition. The same approach could also be used with older dogs, but the results may take a much longer to attain.

To start training with your puppy or dog, first decide upon the level of mouthing that you are prepared to accept and tolerate.

Certain owners are content to allow their dogs to touch their hands with their teeth, as long as no pressure is exerted; while other owners prefer to have no tooth contact at all and will want to get that message across.

While training, the level of your tolerance is reached whenever your puppy gives you a good nip, or grabs your fingers in his mouth, immediately squeal shrilly and loudly in pain and turn your entire body away from the animal.

Place some distance between your self and the puppy by getting up and walking a few paces away from it, keeping your face and eyes averted at all times. Don not speak to it, and don not touch it.

You must aim is to completely socially isolate the puppy for the next twenty to thirty seconds, just long enough for the puppy to realize that it has done something unacceptable, but definitely not too long for it to forget what it was that produced such a response from you. If you keep away too long the puppy is likely to forget the incident and start playing with something else.

Please remember, that if there are other people present, it is very important that they mimic your behavior as well. Do not allow them to play with or otherwise pay any attention to the puppy or dog, for if they do, all your good work will be undone.

Dogs, puppies and even the older ones, have an innate need to chew on something, just anything, whenever they’re being played with or petted. That was the reason the animal mouthed your hand or grabbed your fingers in the first place.

The next step is to take the focus off your hands, and make it realize that your hands and fingers do not make a delightful chew by supplying it with a more appropriate chew.

Rawhide bones, pigs’ ears, or squeezy rubber toys are all perfect for this exercise.

Resume your playing, and if it should start snapping for your hands or face while playing, correct it quickly with a sharp and loud, "No" The animal should stop, startled. As soon as it stops, praise it and then quickly redirect its attention to the appropriate chew you have ready for this purpose.

When the dog’s jaws close around the chew, praise it again and give it a pat. Please remember to never use any physical force for correcting your dog’s inappropriate chewing, mouthing or nipping. Physical force is totally unnecessary, and if used is more likely to actually encourage further nipping and biting.

The cold-shoulder technique, as outlined above, is very effective, and humane, and the most acceptable manner of conveying your displeasure to your pet.

Continue the above process till your dog stops using its mouth on any part of your body or clothing. You have now successfully taught your dog bite inhibition, which is a ‘dog training biting’ skill.

Posted under Puppy Training Biting

This post was written by Noel DCosta on November 5, 2009

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Mouthing and Nipping

is natural and invaluable, and we humans disrupt it by removing puppies from their litter and bring them into are homes to be raised as pets.

Even puppies that have learned bite inhibition from their siblings have to be reconditioned again when they enter a new home as humans do not have the tough hide that puppies have and their skin is much more easily damaged than dogs, so it’s necessary for us to teach the puppy that a bite with any pressure is not acceptable when dealing with humans and their property.

From this it can be seen how important it is to train a puppy on bite inhibition when it has not had the chance to be trained naturally.

Dog Training Biting, to be effective has to be imparted to the puppies before the close four to five months old.

Posted under Puppy Training Biting

This post was written by Noel DCosta on November 3, 2009

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