Labrador Training: Three Secrets To Get Positive Results

Correct labrador training is one certain way to make this breed a perfect man’s best friend. With that pleasant and extremely adaptable temperament, for sure pet owners and their families would like to have this intelligent four-legged creature as pet. But dogs cannot figure out commands by themselves. No matter how intelligent, obedient or even tempered the breed is, right training is highly encouraged to teach them how to behave in ways acceptable by their human companions.

Training is not a one-time session nor a one-week activity. It is actually a long-term process to make sure he learn what he’s supposed to learn at the same time corrected should he made a mistake. To reach the effects you want, here are some points to help you understand labrador training better:

Develop good communication with your dog.

Inability to understand your pet can be as frustrating as inability to make your pet understand you. You are less likely to progress on training if the two of you cannot understand each other. It is therefore important to establish good communication as soon as possible. Since dog’s can’t talk just like humans do, one way to communicate with them is to understand their body language. Wagging of tail, intent stare, barking or curled lips mean something and when misunderstood will certainly affect the training as well as your pet’s behavior. Good communication also allows you to gain your pet’s trust and respect. And when that happens, making your dog obey your commands is surely an easy job to do.

Provide short but high quality training sessions.

Lengthy labrador training does not mean that a dog gets to master lots of lessons and tricks. In fact, it can do more damage than good considering a dog’s short attention span. To keep your dog’s focus, training must be fun, exciting and short. It should not last more than 20 minutes since anything longer than that can be boring even to a dog breed with gentle temperament like the Labrador. Moreover, you also need to ensure that your pet is in good physical shape and mentally prepared for training. Bear in mind that a sick or nervous dog will not learn efficiently so it is better to put off the training for the meantime. Training sessions should also end on a positive note.

Be consistent with training.

Dogs as intelligent as the Labrador can notice and easily get confused when training inconsistencies occur. For instance, you used happy and excited tone of voice when you taught him the come command. Nevertheless, he may consider it a totally different command when you say the said command using an angry or annoyed tone. Put differently, you must have regular labrador training pattern. Once you have determined what strategy works best for your pet, be consistent in using it. It is also essential for family members and anyone who has direct contact with your Lab to be aware and be consistent with the rules.

Posted under Labrador Puppy Training

This post was written by assistant on September 24, 2011

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Labrador Retriever Training The Correct Way

Apart from having fun with their pet labrador, dog owners ought to know that their main concern is to provide proper labrador retriever training at the same time keep these four-legged friends in good physical shape. There are many methods and tools said to be effective in training, nevertheless, owners need to make sure which among these methods is ideal for a specific labrador.

Proper training starts the moment you bring your new pet home. But training at this point in time does not necessarily mean involving complicated lessons like teaching how to play fetch or rollover. A new pet, be a puppy of approximately two months or a grownup dog from the shelter, must be given the opportunity to socialize and to adjust to the new atmosphere you brought him into. Let him meet or see other pets, people, things and places one at a time and make every encounter with them positive as much as possible.

Labrador retrievers are typically even-tempered dogs hence harsh or punishment-based labrador retriever training isn’t needed. These techniques can potentially create unwanted effects to your training goals and to your pet in general instead of improve the condition. With perfect timing, consistency and determination, you’ll be fine with positive reinforcement training, a training method in which a dog is rewarded for doing good behavior to motivate him to display that same behavior again. Rewards, also known as positive reinforcers may include food treats, toys, praise and time to play with the owner or other dogs. Food rewards need to be appealing and really gratifying while toys shouldn’t be too small nor contain parts that can easily break. Toys with pointed or sharp parts must also be avoided to avoid injuries.

Positive reinforcement is also a good method to use during potty training. If you reward your dog for doing his business whenever you take him to the right location, he’ll eventually figure out that he gets good things for doing that particular behavior. This in turn will motivate him to continue doing what he is doing and will soon help him develop regular potty schedule.

While you are training your furry friend where and when to urinate and defecate, you may also start training the basic obedience. Start with the very important labrador retriever training commands like stay, sit, come and down for they’re not only useful in keeping your pet safe but also function as foundation of more complicated tricks like fetch, crawl, roll over and others.

Posted under Labrador Puppy Training

This post was written by assistant on September 23, 2011

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Labrador Retriever Training Objectives

You do not provide labrador retriever training mainly because you’re expected to do so. Training ought to be provided because it is needed in order to make your furry friend healthy and happy. While it’s the general goal of every training, a labrador can be trained to concentrate on attaining a particular objective like becoming a:

Guide dog.
Also known as disabled-assistant or seeing eye dog, guide dogs are trained to guide those with disabilities especially those with visual impairment. Prospective guide dogs are trained early on commencing on socialization, potty training and basic obedience training. After a dog is fully-trained and can be trusted in guiding, he’s then matched with a blind person. After the right dog is partnered to a right person, both are trained to operate together as team. Due to their intelligence and work ethics, Labradors in addition to Golden Retrievers and German Shepherds are the most popular options however, other breeds like Yorkshire Terriers, Poodles and Boxers could become guide dogs as well if given correct labrador retriever training.

Hunting dog.
Labradors are widely-used in hunting too just like other gun dogs. Having been bred to help retrieve fishing nets, Labradors have webbed paws and water-repellent coat, features that help make fishing and waterfowl hunting easy. Additionally, this breed is famous for being athletic and for their love for water and swimming that is why whatever activity that involves water is rarely a problem.

Therapy dog.
Besides their intelligence, the Labrador is known for its stable disposition and friendliness to strangers thus they’re commonly used as therapy dogs to provide affection and comfort to people in hospitals, nursing homes and other areas with stressful scenarios. Since the task of a therapy dog is to permit people even unfamiliar ones to make physical contact, a probable one should be friendly, patient, confident, gentle and comfortable in all situations. In order to become a fantastic therapy dog, a Labrador should go through thorough labrador retriever training process and improve such habits.

Search and rescue dog.
The Labrador is curious and exploratory breed with amazing sense of smell. They even have a reputation of following the odor until they find it. Search and rescue dogs are typically used to uncover missing victims in the wild, disaster areas, avalanche and sea.

Detection dog.
In addition to search and rescue, another role Labradors can perform due to their great sense of smell is detection. Several Labradors are trained to detect explosives, illegal drugs and even blood.

Posted under Labrador Puppy Training

This post was written by assistant on September 23, 2011

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Labrador Retriever Training At Home

Having a gun dog doesn’t necessarily mean you have to sign up your lab to formal labrador retriever training classes. Yes, you can choose to do so but training at home isn’t bad either. In fact, many dog owners like you prefer labrador training at home because it’s a wonderful opportunity for you, your pet and the rest of the family to bond. Through this, you will get to know more about your dog’s character, what frightens him the most, what toys and treats he prefers, what are his funny habits and so on.

Labrador retriever training may seem tough knowing that this breed is considered one of the highly intelligent breeds. But even though you are a new dog owner, you never need to be reluctant of doing things by yourself. You will be fine as long as you put in action the things you learned from reading articles, magazines and books, researching the internet and asking questions from experts as well as other pet owners, especially those who own labrador retrievers.

When you opt to train your pet at home, it is vital that you exhibit confidence to ensure that you earn your pet’s trust and respect. Feeling nervous will only mislead your pet and will not help him learn efficiently. If you’re stressed, unhappy or frustrated, better postpone the training for the moment since dogs have their own way to sense your emotions and may emulate what you are feeling. In addition, lack of confidence on your part could make your furry friend deem that he’s the pack leader. This in turn can stress your pet out because he believes that as alpha, he needs to take charge and defend the pack from what he considers as danger. That’s one big load he thought he must bear! In addition to that, alpha dogs may also exhibit disobedience and may bark back or snap at you when you give a command. So how can you get positive labrador retriever training outcome if you have a disobedient dog?

Move ahead with the training by adding consistency to confidence. If your lab’s name is Max, call him Max throughout the training. Calling him baby or buddy will only result in confusion. The lessons ought to be consistent as well. If you do not want your dog to jump up on people, train him to do so regardless of the situation. You can’t train a dog that it is not alright to jump on you when you are wearing your costly suit while such act is allowed when you are on your pajamas. Letting family members know what’s going on with the training can also help with the consistency issue.

While you focus your attention on training, you might overlook the chance to recognize and reward your pet for every desirable behavior he exhibits. That’s one thing canine owners must never forget. Remember, dogs are motivated by rewards, affection and praise. Rewards will make him figure out that he gets good things by doing a particular task thus will encourage him to do it again next time.

Labrador retriever training at home may appear impossible and hard but with your confidence, consistency as well as cooperation from other family members, you’ll soon realize that you’re moving forward to reach your dream of having a well-trained labrador retriever.

Posted under Labrador Puppy Training

This post was written by assistant on September 23, 2011

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Top Five Labrador Retriever Training Mistakes You Are Not Supposed To Make

Dog training can be difficult particularly to new owners but that is not the case with labrador retriever training. Successful training outcome isn’t unachievable for there are various training methods proven to help you train your precious pet. However, you must also be familiar with the training mistakes so that you will be able to avoid them should they show up.

Physical punishment

Training can be frustrating sometimes particularly if your dog has stubborn character. But even if you’re at your wits end, never ever hit or smack him should he fail to obey what you are asking him to perform. He will not understand that he’s being reprimanded for not knowing how to sit or come or for urinating in the living room while you are not at home. Instead of improve the situation, he may associate the hitting or smacking to training thereby making him afraid of it (training).

Lengthy training sessions

Though a labrador retriever is capable of intense focus especially if the curiosity is captured, we can’t deny the truth that dogs have short attention span. That is why most experts suggest that labrador retriever training sessions must last for 10 to 15 minutes only. {Tackling|Dealing with} the same lesson again and again for two hours can be boring {that is why|that’s why} training lessons must {vary|differ} {from time to time|every so often}. Training activities should also be fun and challenging enough in order to encourage your pet.

Untimely correction

Correct your pet only when you catch him in the act of doing the mistake. Giving correction two hours or even 30 minutes after the deed is done will do you no good since your dog will not understand what the correction is for. The simplest way to correct your pet is to keep an eye on your pet and act instantly when you see him about to do something improper. Through this, he will be able to {associate|connect} the correction with the right deed.

Using different training phrases

Using {different|numerous|various} terms can be confusing to your {pet|furry friend}. For example, if you use “come” command during training, you should be consistent in using it. Using “come here” or “come boy” may mean an entirely different command to him.

Neglecting to recognize good behavior

Every good behavior should be {recognized|acknowledged} and rewarded to make it clear to your dog that you are pleased with what he did. Doing so will not only make him happy but is also more likely to encourage him to repeat doing the behavior he is being rewarded for. Reward doesn’t necessarily need to be delicious treats or new toys. A pat in the back, time to play and plenty of praises should be enough.

Posted under Labrador Puppy Training

This post was written by assistant on September 21, 2011

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Basic Tips For Successful Labrador Training

Labrador training is an essential responsibility every dog owner must carry out. It is important that you take into account the training and other needs of a dog before you bring home one. If training is done successfully, it’ll surely result to a well-behaved dog everybody loves to be around. But be reminded that training is not a one-time process neither a one-week non-stop activity. Successful training is attained in time using the best and useful dog training methods.

Since the labrador is considered as one of the most intelligent and greatly adaptable breeds, it’s not impossible to train your pet to do various tasks such as agility, disabled assistance, search and rescue operations, hunting, therapy work and many others. But before your pet can perform these duties in flying colors, they ought to undertake basic labrador training first.

Here are a few basic tips to help you get started:

Begin training as soon as you bring him home.

The best time to begin training your dog is immediately after you bring him home. Through this, he’ll get accustomed to the new setting you brought him into. During these period, it’s best to get him used to things, places and other stuff he may come across with in the future. Introduce him to resident pets and expose him to kids, other people outside the family including the delivery guy and your neighbors. You may even take him to parks, vet clinic, beach and other places your family frequent. In addition, early training reduces the chances of your dog to develop bad behaviors that can be difficult to break. These behaviors include but not limited to aggression, growling, excessive barking and biting.

Keep training but make it short and enjoyable.

Labrador training does not end once your dog has learned the commands you would like him to learn. Keep training and enforce the commands to your daily activities but be sure that training sessions should not last for more than 20 minutes to prevent your pet from getting bored. Training should be fun and challenging too.

Train with consistency and determination.

It is almost impossible to attain successful training outcome if you’re not consistent and determined enough. Lack of consistency is more likely to confuse your pet while lack of determination can make you give up training or worse, abandon your dog.

Reward good behavior.

Encourage good behavior by rewarding your furry friend whenever he did something desirable. Be it treats or praise, giving of reward is one of the best strategies to let your pet know that you are happy with what he did.

Posted under Labrador Puppy Training

This post was written by assistant on September 21, 2011

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Labrador Training: How To Crate Train Your Pet

Labrador training makes life simpler for you and your pet. A young puppy who can entertain the crowd with his cute antics can definitely paint a smile on everyone’s face. But an adult dog who obeys commands without making a fuss is what makes every dog owner feel that training is indeed rewarding.

There are various ways to attain successful training, so many approaches and tools from which to choose. One tool that is frequently used by many pet owners and recommended by a lot of experts and trainers is the crate. Although some people consider crate as cruel, it is in reality very helpful not merely during labrador training but throughout your pet’s entire life. Providing a crate is just like providing your lab with haven wherein he’ll be cozy, safe and protected.

A dog crate could be made of metal, wire, plastic or fabric. It’s an enclosure with a door that is excellent in keeping your dog safe when leaving him unaccompanied at home or when taking him on a trip be it by car or by plane. It is also a powerful tool when working with housebreaking issues and various obedience commands.

In order for your pet to acknowledge the crate without going through a lot of trouble, barking and whimpering, do not drive him to get inside it (crate) at once. Place the crate in the area where the family spends a considerable time and allow him to explore it freely. You might want to add toys, soft blanket or towel and other things he likes to further persuade him to come near and get inside the crate. Dropping a few treats around and inside the crate helps as well. Praise him each time he’s making progress.

The moment he gets inside the crate, praise and reward him with a special treat. With this, he’ll eventually figure out that he gets good things for entering the crate thus will further encourage him to remain inside for a longer period. Once he became comfortable being inside the crate, close it for a few seconds at first and reward him if he remains relaxed. Gradually increase the time of the crate being closed.

Training your labrador to get accustomed to crates may take days and even weeks but once he has done it, it’ll definitely benefit you and your dog in a lot of ways. With a crate trained labrador, you can confidently leave the house without having to worry that something bad might possibly happen while you’re gone.

Posted under Labrador Puppy Training

This post was written by assistant on July 21, 2011

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Small Dog Coaching – Methods To Identify Your Dog’s Feelings

Make puppy coaching easier and more fantastic by understanding that your puppy is attempting to communicate to you in other methods than barking or wagging his tail. Keep in mind, your puppy also communicates with ears, tail, paws, mouth and more. This makes your everyday life puppy training more fun.
Here is brief guide to some basic dog body language and what it means:

Dominant – You’ll discover that a dominant dog has its ears straight up or forward, its mouth gently opened or closed, its eyes open wide or staring, its body standing firm and tall with hackles possibly raised, and its tail out from the body stiffened or fluffed. Low and aggressive bark can usually be predicted.

Friendly – A friendly dog have perked up ears, open and attentive eyes, a relaxed mouth, a tail or full rear end wagging, and probably howling, yapping or giving little barks.

Submissive – A dog with its ears tightly back, eyes closed and paw raised is showing drastic submission. The dog isn’t excited but shows it will not strike.

Aggressive – aggressive dog has its ears flattened back against its head, its eyes narrowed or daunting, body rigid, mouth open to show teeth and tail apprehended out from the body and fluffed up if attainable. Snarls or growls are typical.

Worried – Sharp barks combined with growling, ears flattened and neck hairs raised means “I’m worried” or “something is wrong.”

Fear – A puppy shows tension with a lowered stance, tail down or tucked underneath, an arched back, looking or rotating head while showing the whites of their whites of eyes and dilated pupils. Dogs generally bark out of fear, particularly if they are cornered, fenced in, or on a leash.

Stressed – nervous puppy will usually have ears back and down, considerable open mouth, lips drawn back with rapid respiration. Also shoulders lowered, hunched forward, tail tucked, tension in haunches and will possibly be quivering.

Now that you figure out more about what your doggy is attempting to say to you concerning how he feels or the mood he is in try to accommodate this in your puppy training and day to day life.

In a puppy training session your puppy should be revealing that he is in friendly or playful mood. If he shows he is dominant then you realize that he might not be considering you seriously or could be being uncontrollable and you probably ought to be more assertive.

Some docile behavior is not horrible thing as it indicates that that he realizes that you are in charge.

If your puppy gets anxious, fearful, worried or even violent, you must stop your labrador puppy training and comfort your dog immediately. If you have been coaching for more than 15 minutes stop and get a break. When you come back takes things slowly or approach issues in separate way

Use your experience in every day life too. Observe your puppy in various incidents and you will quickly discover what he likes and dislikes or how he is feeling. You can then take strategy to give him more of what he likes and more support, confidence and training in situations he discovers more complex.

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Posted under Labrador Puppy Training

This post was written by assistant on August 17, 2010

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Lab Puppy Training Will Produce A Loving Friend

Lab puppy care will make a significant difference in the life of a dog. People usually get their dogs when they are little puppies so the training and care of this puppy can be important to the long life of the dog. Lab puppy care should start from the choice of the breed. Lab puppy care is quite easy compared to the care of these dogs grown to full size. A Lab puppy is usually an adorable bundle of soft hair that eats a little bit from a bowl carefully placed on the kitchen floor. A full grown Lab can be a huge, monstrous dog that is filled with unbelievable energy. Anyone looking for a new pet should check out the full grown animals.

Lab puppy care should start with choosing an expert breeder. These people know how to produce great dogs, and they start training the dogs properly at a very young age. This training could make a difference in the behavior of the dog from the very beginning until the dog ages gracefully. Lab puppy care will be much easier if the breeder has done the proper dog training from the birth of the dog.When the dog has grown completely, this proper training should make a huge difference when trying to control a huge, full-grown Lab.

Lab Puppy Care Includes Serious Training Methods And Proper Nutrition

Nothing is more important in Lab puppy care than proper healthcare. Each puppy should have some shots before they are turned over to the new owner. These shots should be followed up on a regular basis with periodic visits to a qualified veterinarian. The proper shots from a doctor will help to avoid serious problems with each puppy. Lab puppy care should include special attention to the eyes of the puppy. Labs are often susceptible to eye problems so this is very important.

Lab puppy care includes a place for exercise because Labs are very frisky and energetic. These puppies should be able to get enough exercise.A Lab puppy who gets some attention with a game of fetch will not get into other mischief. Lab puppy care requires some basic puppy training including staying happily on a leash and sitting when commanded. All the members of the family should take part in the training of the puppy or the puppy will respond to some members and not others.


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This post was written by Noel DCosta on July 26, 2009

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